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November 28 - It's the little things that make life special, so pay close attention while you wash dishes or proofread that report. You can find grace almost anywhere on a day like today, and it's worth the search.

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  • The Telegraph

    Doctors in China jailed for harvesting organs from patients

    Six people in China, four of whom are doctors, have been sentenced to prison for illegally harvesting organs from patients, often car accident victims or those with severe brain damage. A court in Anhui province has handed down terms of 10 to 28 months to the group of six, declaring them guilty of harvesting organs from 11 deceased patients, according to Chinese state media. The detailed judgment, issued in July but made public only now, described a network of doctors from different hospitals who worked together on the organ harvesting scheme. After identifying potential candidates, the doctors would then approach patients’ families and ask them to sign fraudulent consent forms agreeing to organ donation on behalf of their deceased relatives. Families, however, believed they were signing legitimate papers. Operations to remove the organs were performed by the doctors in delivery vans disguised as an ambulance, according to state media. China has long struggled to manage voluntary organ donation and experts have said that there isn’t enough to meet demand. Human rights experts have long drawn attention to the practice of harvesting organs from prisoners, including political dissidents who have been put behind bars, in order to supply a lucrative organ trade. Last year, an independent tribunal in the UK led by Sir Geoffrey Nice QC, concluded that China was a “criminal state,” which “beyond reasonable doubt” had committed crimes of humanity, acts of torture, and found that enemies of the state were medically tested and killed for their organs. The China Tribunal heard evidence over six months, and in a judgement that took one-and-a-half hours to read, concluded that followers of Falun Gong, a religious spiritual practice, were among those used as a source for forced organ harvesting. The finding also said there was a risk Uighurs, an ethnic Muslim minority persecuted by the Chinese state, have suffered similar treatment. Last year, a study published in BMC Medical Ethics journal found “highly compelling evidence” that China was falsifying organ donation numbers, potentially masking the source and fueling further concern that transplants were still coming from prisoners. In 2005, former health minister Huang Jiefu publicly acknowledged that China had indeed harvested organs for transplant from executed prisoners. Beijing, however, has long denied doing so.

    The Telegraph

    Doctors in China jailed for harvesting organs from patients

    Six people in China, four of whom are doctors, have been sentenced to prison for illegally harvesting organs from patients, often car accident victims or those with severe brain damage. A court in Anhui province has handed down terms of 10 to 28 months to the group of six, declaring them guilty of harvesting organs from 11 deceased patients, according to Chinese state media. The detailed judgment, issued in July but made public only now, described a network of doctors from different hospitals who worked together on the organ harvesting scheme. After identifying potential candidates, the doctors would then approach patients’ families and ask them to sign fraudulent consent forms agreeing to organ donation on behalf of their deceased relatives. Families, however, believed they were signing legitimate papers. Operations to remove the organs were performed by the doctors in delivery vans disguised as an ambulance, according to state media. China has long struggled to manage voluntary organ donation and experts have said that there isn’t enough to meet demand. Human rights experts have long drawn attention to the practice of harvesting organs from prisoners, including political dissidents who have been put behind bars, in order to supply a lucrative organ trade. Last year, an independent tribunal in the UK led by Sir Geoffrey Nice QC, concluded that China was a “criminal state,” which “beyond reasonable doubt” had committed crimes of humanity, acts of torture, and found that enemies of the state were medically tested and killed for their organs. The China Tribunal heard evidence over six months, and in a judgement that took one-and-a-half hours to read, concluded that followers of Falun Gong, a religious spiritual practice, were among those used as a source for forced organ harvesting. The finding also said there was a risk Uighurs, an ethnic Muslim minority persecuted by the Chinese state, have suffered similar treatment. Last year, a study published in BMC Medical Ethics journal found “highly compelling evidence” that China was falsifying organ donation numbers, potentially masking the source and fueling further concern that transplants were still coming from prisoners. In 2005, former health minister Huang Jiefu publicly acknowledged that China had indeed harvested organs for transplant from executed prisoners. Beijing, however, has long denied doing so.

  • The Associated Press

    Broncos: Lock safe after QB Driskel goes on COVID-19 list

    Denver Broncos No. 3 quarterback Jeff Driskel was placed on the COVID-19 list Thursday but contact tracing showed starter Drew Lock and the Broncos' other QBs weren't in danger of being infected by the coronavirus. Lock, backup Brett Rypien and practice squad QB Blake Bortles all practiced on Thanksgiving after the Broncos consulted with Dr. Allen Sills, the league's chief medical officer.

    The Associated Press

    Broncos: Lock safe after QB Driskel goes on COVID-19 list

    Denver Broncos No. 3 quarterback Jeff Driskel was placed on the COVID-19 list Thursday but contact tracing showed starter Drew Lock and the Broncos' other QBs weren't in danger of being infected by the coronavirus. Lock, backup Brett Rypien and practice squad QB Blake Bortles all practiced on Thanksgiving after the Broncos consulted with Dr. Allen Sills, the league's chief medical officer.

  • Reuters

    Canada police airport liaison had concerns about arresting Huawei CFO on plane, court hears

    A police officer overseeing enforcement at the Vancouver airport testified in court on Thursday that he had concerns about a plan by Canadian federal police to arrest Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou on the plane she arrived on two years ago. Meng's nearly three-hour interrogation by Canadian border agents prior to her December 2018 arrest by Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) on a U.S. warrant has become a flash point in her ongoing extradition hearing.

    Reuters

    Canada police airport liaison had concerns about arresting Huawei CFO on plane, court hears

    A police officer overseeing enforcement at the Vancouver airport testified in court on Thursday that he had concerns about a plan by Canadian federal police to arrest Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou on the plane she arrived on two years ago. Meng's nearly three-hour interrogation by Canadian border agents prior to her December 2018 arrest by Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) on a U.S. warrant has become a flash point in her ongoing extradition hearing.

  • Town & Country

    Take a Look Back at Prince Charles and Princess Diana's Engagement Photos

    As The Crown's fourth season follows this famous relationship, we took a look back at that iconic pre-wedding photoshoot. From Town & Country

    Town & Country

    Take a Look Back at Prince Charles and Princess Diana's Engagement Photos

    As The Crown's fourth season follows this famous relationship, we took a look back at that iconic pre-wedding photoshoot. From Town & Country

  • Bloomberg

    Indian Banks to See Jump in Non-Performing Loans: CreditSights

    Nov.27 -- Pramod Shenoi, head of Asia Pacific financials research at CreditSights, discusses the outlook for Indian banks, the economy and policies. Indian lenders are making fresh loans at the slowest pace in at least three years as the coronavirus outbreak damps demand. Shenoi speaks with Rishaad Salamat and Juliette Saly on "Bloomberg Markets: Asia."

    Bloomberg

    Indian Banks to See Jump in Non-Performing Loans: CreditSights

    Nov.27 -- Pramod Shenoi, head of Asia Pacific financials research at CreditSights, discusses the outlook for Indian banks, the economy and policies. Indian lenders are making fresh loans at the slowest pace in at least three years as the coronavirus outbreak damps demand. Shenoi speaks with Rishaad Salamat and Juliette Saly on "Bloomberg Markets: Asia."

  • BBC

    Sri Lanka digs trench to keep elephants away from rubbish dump

    Elephants have been swarming to a landfill site, where they have been eating harmful plastics.

    BBC

    Sri Lanka digs trench to keep elephants away from rubbish dump

    Elephants have been swarming to a landfill site, where they have been eating harmful plastics.

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